Lindsay Pryor Arboretum

27 Jan

Yeah, we’ve got the National Arboretum… but as lovely as it is, it’s a little lacking on fully grown trees. Literally just across the Parkway is the Lindsay Pryor Arboretum, with a small but fully grown forests of native and exotic trees. Built in the 1950s at the ‘suggestion’ of the then Governor-General Field Marshal William Slim who wanted to improve the view from the GG’s residence, the arboretum was and is used as a place of scientific research and education. Better still, the arboretum is dog friendly, and a great place to explore.

We park in the Lindsay Pryor Arboretum’s rather nice car park at Yarramundi Reach. The car park links with some well thought-out and maintained bike paths, which are being enjoyed by many on this Australia Day morning. Cooper is keen to explore, so we follow the main, gravelled trail towards the entrance to the Arboretum.

Looking back towards the car park

Looking back towards the car park

We encounter many dogs and their owners – both as friendly as the other – on our approach, and I’m comforted that we’re in for a good walk.

We spot the entrance in the distance with the usual bright red signs. A plaque sits beside it; both do a good job of explaining the significance of the place.

Plaque at the entrance to the Lindsay Pryor Arboretum

Plaque at the entrance to the Lindsay Pryor Arboretum

Sign next to the plaque at the entrance to the Lindsay Pryor Arboretum

Sign next to the plaque at the entrance to the Lindsay Pryor Arboretum

There’s a large shade structure at the entrance, but no barbecue. It’s well built and maintained, but without views to the lake, I can’t see it being used. Instead, the picnic tables which border the lake are enjoyed by picnickers and their owners.

Large shade structure at the entrance

Large shade structure at the entrance

From here, the ‘wood’ immediately provides plenty of shade, with views toward Lake Burley Griffin.

Gorgeous

Gorgeous

After a short stroll, we walk into what I assume are the ‘exotic conifers’ – plenty of pine needles for Cooper to roll in, and cones for him to chase and chew (!).

Exotic conifers

Exotic conifers

My childhood fascination kicks in from here. I spot my first cicada shell on a pine… and then we realise there are thousands.

Cicada shell!

Cicada shell!

Many cicada shells!

Many cicada shells!

And, yep, more!

And, yep, more!

We also spot a leaf seemingly dancing on its own, a la the plastic bag from American Beauty. It’s attached to a spider’s web, but it’s no less fascinating to watch it dance!

From here we approach the path which follows the edge of the lake – but first with a look towards Black Mountain.

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There are plenty of reeds in bloom.

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And berries…

Safe for eating? Not game to try out.

Safe for eating? Not game to try out.

At this point, the path heads into the cork oaks.

!

!

And, you guessed it…

More cicadas

More cicadas

We’re then at the closest point to view the G-G’s house – and for the G-G to view the Lindsay Pryor Arboretum.

Looking over the reeds the Lindsay Pryor Arboretum towards the G-G's residence

Looking over the reeds the Lindsay Pryor Arboretum towards the G-G’s residence

Past here, the path takes us through more vegetation, but with plenty of opportunities for Cooper to dip into the lake.

If you keep your eyes peeled, there’s even a special area called ‘Tilly’s Beach’, together with sticks ready to throw to excited dogs.

Tilly's beach

Tilly’s beach

There’s another picnic area past here, and then it’s a casual pace back through the eucalypts to the car park.

The car park also borders the proposed site for the National Rock Garden… I thought it had already been built, so was horrified to discover there were only a handful of rocks in place. Fortunately, I can confirm it’s definitely proposed. That said, the Federation Rocks are still in place.

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074

With thanks to John Evans for suggesting the Lindsay Pryor Arboretum. Cooper and I enjoyed it so much, we go back the next day.

Date: Saturday, 25 January 2014

Where: Barrenjoey Drive, Lindsay Pryor Aboretum, Yarramundi Reach

Cost: Free

Worthwhile factor: Worthwhile

Want more? Check out this brochure here. I love that it gives a little sense of what we can expect the National Aboretum to look like in 20-50 years.

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3 Responses to “Lindsay Pryor Arboretum”

  1. John Evans January 27, 2014 at 11:08 pm #

    … And it has geocaches πŸ˜ƒ

  2. Alison (from Chifley) January 28, 2014 at 8:25 pm #

    It’s gorgeous in Autumn. You’ll need to go back. The light, the light…. πŸ™‚

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